Traditional recipes

Korean Rice Bowl with Steak, Asparagus, and Fried Egg

Korean Rice Bowl with Steak, Asparagus, and Fried Egg

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon sesame seeds
  • 3/4 teaspoon fleur de sel
  • 1/2 teaspoon New Mexico chile powder
  • 1 1/2 pounds New York strip steak, trimmed
  • 3 tablespoons Asian sesame oil, divided
  • 2 green onions, finely chopped
  • 1 tablespoon sake or dry Sherry
  • 1 1/2 pounds slender asparagus spears, trimmed
  • 2 teaspoons vegetable oil plus additional for brushing
  • 6 cups freshly cooked medium-grain white rice
  • Korean hot pepper paste (kochujang)

Recipe Preparation

  • Toast sesame seeds in small skillet over medium heat until golden brown, stirring often, about 3 minutes. Transfer sesame seeds to small bowl to cool. Grind sesame seeds, fleur de sel, and chile powder in mortar with pestle or in spice mill until about half of sesame seeds are finely ground. Return to same small bowl. DO AHEAD Sesame salt can be made 1 day ahead. Cover and let stand at room temperature.

  • Place steak in freezer 1 hour for easy slicing. Cut steak crosswise into 1/8-inch-thick slices. Whisk soy sauce, 2 tablespoons sesame oil, green onions, sugar, sake, and garlic in medium bowl. Toss steak in soy mixture. Let marinate at room temperature 30 minutes, tossing occasionally.

  • Heat griddle or 2 heavy large skillets over medium-high heat. Toss asparagus with 2 teaspoons vegetable oil on large rimmed baking sheet. Sauté asparagus until crisp-tender, about 4 minutes. Return to rimmed baking sheet. Sprinkle sesame salt over; drizzle with remaining 1 tablespoon sesame oil. Tent with foil to keep warm.

  • Brush griddle with vegetable oil. Working in batches, grill steak until just browned, about 1 minute per side. Transfer to bowl; tent with foil to keep warm.

  • Brush griddle with vegetable oil. Crack eggs onto hot griddle. Cook until whites are set but yolks are still runny, 2 to 3 minutes.

  • Divide warm rice among bowls. Divide asparagus, then beef among bowls, placing atop rice. Top with fried egg. Serve with Korean hot pepper paste and kimchi.

Nutritional Content

One serving contains the following: Calories (kcal) 567.6 %Calories from Fat 31.7 Fat (g) 20.4 Saturated Fat (g) 5.2 Cholesterol (mg) 264.3 Carbohydrates (g) 55.6 Dietary Fiber (g) 3.4 Total Sugars (g) 8.2 Net Carbs (g) 52.3 Protein (g) 38.8Reviews SectionVery easy and super delicious! The effort to flavor ratio was really good.

Kitchen Bitch

Let me start by saying: I could eat this dish for breakfast, lunch, or dinner. Or brinner. Or brunch.

It’s what you might call a “crossover” meal, as anything with a fried egg can be deemed breakfast OR dinner, at least in my book. (And I’m sure many of you, dear readers, agree).

It’s savory. It’s comforting. It’s satisfying. It’s a big bowl of simple ingredients put together to make something truly special—something worth waking up on Sunday morning just to make. (more…)

Give Me Some of That Bibimbap! August 4, 2010

To get KB delivered to your inbox, click Subscribe at the bottom of this page

A Beautiful Bibimbap: Korean Rice Bowl with Steak, Asparagus, and Fried Egg

So, I had this really great idea. I was going to bring you, my dear readers, the KB’s Asian Food Week. Not only would this week include several great recipes inspired by my favorite Asian nations, it would also feature an outstanding Japanese food slideshow complete with commentary on all the weird stuff I got to eat when I was in Tokyo, Japan, last year.

Alas, WordPress won’t let me upload my slideshow without paying some silly fee, and YouTube quality, as we all know, is miserable, so the KB’s Japanese Food Show will have to wait until I have time to conquer Apple’s iMovie program and produce a slideshow of presentable quality.

In the meantime, though, I’m offering a taste of Asian Food Week with today’s recipe, bibimbap. Bibimbap is basically a Korean rice bowl with steak, asparagus, and fried egg. It’s simple, delicious and great with an ice-cold beer. The garnishes, if you can find them, are what really set this dish apart.

I ventured to a Korean market here in Chicago—Chicago Food Corporation, aka Joong Boo Market—in search of freshly made kimchi. Kimchi (also spelled kimchee or gimchee) is a spicy traditional Korean side dish of fermented or pickled vegetables, with cabbage being the most commonly used main ingredient. The market had an entire salad bar dedicated to kimchi, so there were a variety of options to choose from. I picked a kimchi with fermented leeks.

I also picked up some Korean hot pepper paste there, although you might be able to find it at your local grocery store or specialty market. I found one labeled “Chile Paste With Garlic” and considered it close enough to what I was looking for. The kimchi and the chile paste are SPICY, so test them out before you add them both to your rice bowl. Either way, I think you’ll be coming back to this dish again and again. The combo of warm rice, meaty steak, crunchy asparagus, fried egg and spicy kimchi hit your taste buds in all the rights spots.

Bibimbap: Korean Rice Bowl with Steak, Asparagus, and Fried Egg
This recipe, adapted from Ivy Manning, is a take on a Korean dish called bibimbap. Be sure to taste the hot pepper paste and kimchi before putting them on your plate. Both garnishes really pack a punch on their own. Serves 6 567 calories, 20.4 g fat, and 3.4 g fiber per serving. Click here to print a copy of this recipe.

1 Tbs. sesame seeds
¾ tsp. fleur de sel, sea salt or Kosher salt
½ tsp. New Mexico or Ancho chile powder
1½ lb. New York strip steak, trimmed
¼ c. soy sauce
3 Tbs. sesame oil, divided
2 green onions, finely chopped
2 Tbs. sugar
1 Tbs. sake or dry Sherry
1 garlic clove, minced
1½ lbs. slender asparagus spears, trimmed
2 tsp. vegetable oil plus additional for brushing
6 large eggs
6 c. freshly cooked medium-grain white rice
Korean hot pepper paste (kochujang)
Kimchi

Prepare spice blend. Toast sesame seeds in small skillet over medium heat until golden brown, stirring often, about 3 minutes. Transfer sesame seeds to small bowl to cool. Grind sesame seeds, fleur de sel, and chile powder in mortar with pestle or in spice mill until about half of sesame seeds are finely ground. Return to same small bowl. DO AHEAD: Sesame salt can be made 1 day ahead. Cover and let stand at room temperature.

Marinate steak. Place steak in freezer 1 hour for easy slicing. Cut steak crosswise into 1/8-inch-thick slices. Whisk soy sauce, 2 tablespoons sesame oil, green onions, sugar, sake, and garlic in medium bowl. Toss steak in soy mixture. Let marinate at room temperature 30 minutes, tossing occasionally.

Cook asparagus. Heat griddle or 2 heavy large skillets over medium-high heat. Toss asparagus with 2 teaspoons vegetable oil on large rimmed baking sheet. Sauté asparagus until crisp-tender, about 4 minutes. Return to rimmed baking sheet. Sprinkle sesame salt over drizzle with remaining 1 tablespoon sesame oil. Tent with foil to keep warm.

Grill steak and cook eggs. Brush griddle with vegetable oil. Working in batches, grill steak until just browned, about 1 minute per side. Transfer to bowl tent with foil to keep warm. Brush griddle with vegetable oil. Crack eggs onto hot griddle. Cook until whites are set but yolks are still runny, 2 to 3 minutes.

Garnish and serve. Divide warm rice among bowls. Divide asparagus, then beef among bowls, placing atop rice. Top with fried egg. Serve with Korean hot pepper paste and kimchi.


Korean Rice Bowl with Steak, Asparagus, and Fried Egg - Recipes

Korean Bibimbap with Steak & Asparagus
Adapted loosely from Bon Appetit, April 2010 serves 4

ingredients
1 lb New York strip steak, trimmed
3 T toasted sesame seeds, divided
1/2 c low sodium soy sauce
3 T + 2 t Asian sesame oil, divided
2 green onions, finely chopped
3 T light brown sugar, divided
1 T Chinese black rice vinegar
1 T garlic, minced
1 T fresh ginger, minced
1 t crushed red pepper flakes
3/4 t Maldon sea salt
1/2 t hot smoked paprika
4 T Korean red pepper paste (gochujang)
1 lb slender asparagus spears, trimmed
1 c carrots, sliced thinly
1 c enoki mushrooms, or other variety
2 t evoo plus additional for brushing
4 large eggs
4 cups freshly cooked medium-grain white rice
Kimchi, optional, for serving

instructions
place steak in freezer for 1/2 hour to make slicing easier. meanwhile, make marinade, paste mixture, and sesame salt.

bulgogi marinade
combine 1 T toasted sesame seeds, 1/2 c soy, 2 T sesame oil, green onions, 2 T brown sugar, black rice vinegar, garlic, ginger, and red pepper flakes in medium bowl. once steak is somewhat firm, remove from freezer and slice crosswise into 1/8 thick slices. add to marinade and let marinate at room temperature for at least 1/2 hour. you can marinate overnight, if so remove from fridge at least 1/2 hour before cooking and let come to room temp.

paste mixture
combine 1 T sesame seeds, 2 t sesame oil, 1 T toasted sesame seeds, and 1 T brown sugar. set aside.

sesame salt
combine remaining 1 T sesame seeds, 3/4 t sea salt, and paprika in spice grinder or mortar and pestle. combine until somewhat smooth. set aside.

heat large skillet over medium-high heat. Toss asparagus with 2 teaspoons olive oil on large rimmed baking sheet. Sauté asparagus until crisp-tender, about 4 minutes. Return to rimmed baking sheet. Sprinkle sesame salt over drizzle with remaining 1 tablespoon sesame oil. Tent with foil to keep warm, or place in warm oven. Repeat process with carrots or any other vegetables you use, adjusting cooking time as needed. Cook each vegetable separately.

Brush grill panor skillet with vegetable oil. Working in batches, grill steak until just browned, about 1 minute per side. Transfer to bowl tent with foil to keep warm.

Crack eggs onto skillet. Cook until whites are set but yolks are still runny, 2 to 3 minutes.

Divide warm rice among bowls. Divide asparagus, carrots, then beef among bowls, placing atop rice. Top with fried egg. Serve with Korean hot pepper paste mixture and kimchi.


What can I use for Dolsot bibimbap if I don’t have Dolsot (Stone Pot)?

You can enjoy Dolsot Bibimbap without buying the somewhat expensive Korean Stone Pot (it’s wonderful but costs about $40

$60). Try one of the following:

  • cast iron pan – I bought an 8 inch Lodge Cast Iron pan for the video and it worked great as an individual serving dish. See pic above. You can also use other cast iron pots/pans and they should work fine.
  • ttukbaegi – ceramic hot pot that’s used for jjigae (e.g. soft tofu stew).

Heat rice and toppings in these pots/pans on medium low heat


How To Make Korean Beef

  • In a small bowl, mix the sauce ingredients.
  • Brown the hamburger meat until cooked through.
  • Stir in the garlic and ginger and cook for a couple of minutes.
  • Pour the sauce over the ground beef mixture and let it simmer for 2 – 3 minutes.
Make The Korean Sauce Before You Start Browning The Hamburger Meat

Gochujang is a chili paste with savory, sweet and spicy flavors. It is made from red chiles, glutinous rice (sticky rice) and fermented soybeans. This condiment gives Korean food its distinct and complex flavor. You can find it in the Asian area of your supermarket.

Absolutely! Although the flavor won’t have that authentic Korean taste, red pepper flakes are a great substitute for this ground beef recipe

Yes, you can make this recipe with ground chicken, ground turkey, ground pork or lamb.

This easy ground beef recipe can be made 3 days in advance and stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator. You can also meal-prep bowls by storing the rice and the Korean ground beef into individual portions. You can top this tasty Asian inspired meal with the pickled veggies. It makes for a tasty and quick lunch to take to work.


To make traditional Korean japchae noodles, you will need the following ingredients:

  • Dangmyeon noodles: These are the traditional sweet potato noodles (also known as “glass noodles”) used to make japchae. They are made from two ingredients — sweet potato starch and water — and have an ever-so-slightly-sweet taste and a satisfying chewy texture. They are naturally gluten-free, and can be purchased at your local Asian market or online. Also, most brands of sweet potato noodles make them super long, so I recommend using some kitchen scissors to cut the noodles once they have been cooked and drained, if you would like.
  • Protein: The protein in this recipe is up to you! I typically make my japchae with either steak, chicken, shrimp or tofu.
  • Veggies: I used a mix of onion, shiitake mushrooms, red bell pepper, carrot, garlic and spinach. But feel free to use whatever stir-fry-friendly veggies and greens you love best.
  • Stir-fry sauce: Which is made with a simple mix of low-sodium soy sauce (or tamari), maple syrup and toasted sesame oil.
  • Toppings: Japchae is traditionally sprinkled with toasted sesame seeds just before serving, but I like to sprinkle some thinly sliced green onions on top too.


Bulgogi recipe

Marinated beef, shredded vegetables, green veg and brown rice, bulgogi is full of goodness and makes a great protein-packed dinner. Save any leftovers and enjoy for lunch the next day.

Ingredients

  • 300 g rib-eye steak, sliced
  • 2 tbsp oyster sauce (we like Lee Kum Kee Premium Oyster Sauce)
  • 1 tbsp gochujang (Korean chilli paste)
  • 1 tbsp cornflour
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tsp ground black pepper
  • 1 tbsp light soy sauce (we like Lee Kum Kee Premium Light Soy Sauce)
  • 1 tbsp sesame oil (we like Lee Kum Kee Pure Sesame Oil)
  • 2 red onions, sliced
  • 15 g ginger, finely diced
  • 4 tbsp vegetable oil, divided into two
  • 10.6 oz rib-eye steak, sliced
  • 2 tbsp oyster sauce (we like Lee Kum Kee Premium Oyster Sauce)
  • 1 tbsp gochujang (Korean chilli paste)
  • 1 tbsp cornflour
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tsp ground black pepper
  • 1 tbsp light soy sauce (we like Lee Kum Kee Premium Light Soy Sauce)
  • 1 tbsp sesame oil (we like Lee Kum Kee Pure Sesame Oil)
  • 2 red onions, sliced
  • 0.5 oz ginger, finely diced
  • 4 tbsp vegetable oil, divided into two
  • 10.6 oz rib-eye steak, sliced
  • 2 tbsp oyster sauce (we like Lee Kum Kee Premium Oyster Sauce)
  • 1 tbsp gochujang (Korean chilli paste)
  • 1 tbsp cornflour
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tsp ground black pepper
  • 1 tbsp light soy sauce (we like Lee Kum Kee Premium Light Soy Sauce)
  • 1 tbsp sesame oil (we like Lee Kum Kee Pure Sesame Oil)
  • 2 red onions, sliced
  • 0.5 oz ginger, finely diced
  • 4 tbsp vegetable oil, divided into two
  • 500 g cooked rice
  • 0.5 cucumber, sliced
  • 60 g shredded carrots
  • 2 fried eggs
  • 2 pinches sesame seeds, to garnish
  • 17.6 oz cooked rice
  • 0.5 cucumber, sliced
  • 2.1 oz shredded carrots
  • 2 fried eggs
  • 2 pinches sesame seeds, to garnish
  • 17.6 oz cooked rice
  • 0.5 cucumber, sliced
  • 2.1 oz shredded carrots
  • 2 fried eggs
  • 2 pinches sesame seeds, to garnish

Details

  • Cuisine: Korean
  • Recipe Type: Beef
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Preparation Time: 10 mins
  • Cooking Time: 10 mins
  • Serves: 2

Step-by-step

  1. Combine the oyster sauce, gochujang, cornflour, egg, black pepper, light soy sauce and sesame oil to create a marinade for the beef.
  2. Add to the beef and marinate for at least 30 minutes before cooking. (Tip: Give the beef a good rub. You can wear a glove and mix in a circular motion to massage in the marinade and tenderise the beef.)
  3. Add 2 tbsp of vegetable oil in a hot pan over medium-high heat. Add marinated beef into the pan and stir-fry for about 6 minutes until it is cooked through. Transfer from the pan to a bowl.
  4. With the same pan, add 2 tbsp of vegetable oil over a medium heat. Add the onions and ginger and stir-fry them for 2&ndash3 minutes until the onions are softened.
  5. Add the cooked beef back in and give it a quick stir until it is reheated and mixed well.
  6. Cook the brown rice as per pack instructions. Divide the rice into two bowls then add the beef, cucumber and carrots and top with a fried egg. Garnish with sesame seeds and serve.

This recipe is by Sandy Tang for Lee Kum Kee.

You might also like:

Comments

Do you want to comment on this article? You need to be signed in for this feature


This Savory Spicy Korean Rice Bowl Recipe Will Knock Your Socks Off

Featuring a colorful collection of fresh, blanched vegetables and a bright golden egg, these Korean rice bowls offer the perfect blend of savory wholesomeness and a spicy kick.

Our Korean rice bowl recipe is a take on bibimbap, a popular Korean dish of rice topped with vegetables, sliced meat, a fried egg and hot sauce. This inexpensive recipe requires about 20 minutes of prep time, and 25 minutes of cooking time – and it delivers a potent flavor combination with soy sauce, Sriracha and toasted sesame seeds.

Ingredients

2 cups jasmine rice, rinsed well
2 cups fresh snow peas, thinly sliced lengthwise
3 medium-sized carrots, shredded
¼ pound green cabbage, thinly sliced
¼ cup vegetable oil
4 organic eggs
2 teaspoon toasted sesame seeds
2 scallions, thinly sliced
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Low-sodium soy sauce (or garnish)
Sriracha (or garnish)

  1. Bring the jasmine rice, three cups of water and ½ teaspoon of salt to a boil in a small saucepan. Cover and reduce heat to low. Simmer until the rice is tender and the water is absorbed, about 18-20 minutes.
  1. Meanwhile, bring a medium saucepan of water and ½ teaspoon of salt to a boil. Add the snow peas to the pan, and cook for about 15 seconds or until they are crisp-tender. Remove with a handled strainer (or spider utensil) and transfer to a small bowl.
  1. Next, add the shredded carrots to the saucepan and cook until they are crisp-tender, about 15 seconds. Transfer to a small bowl with a handled strainer.
  1. Now, add the sliced cabbage to the boiling water and cook until crisp-tender, about 15 seconds. Remove with a handled strainer and transfer to a small bowl.
  1. Heat your vegetable oil over high heat in a large non-stick skillet. Crack each egg gently, and add it to the skillet, one after another. Spoon the oil over the eggs and cook two minutes, or until the whites are just set and the edges are crispy.
  1. Now you’re ready to assemble your bowls. Divide the rice between four serving bowls, and add separate mounds of snow peas, carrots, cabbage, sliced scallions, and egg.
  1. Garnish each rice bowl with ½ teaspoon toasted sesame seeds. Drizzle with low-sodium soy sauce and add Sriracha for a kick, if desired.

Upgrade your rice bowl’s nutrition profile by using brown rice instead of jasmine rice.

Make yours meaty by topping each rice bowl with ¼ pound cooked chicken, shrimp or steak. Always choose sustainable meats from eco-friendly sources.

Hate runny yolks? Cook your egg yolk all the way.

Any vegetables that you happen to have on hand can work – in fact, this recipe is a great way to use up leftovers. Try zucchini, mushrooms, spinach, soybean or mung bean sprouts, asparagus,

Tired of Sriracha? Use kochujang instead – it’s a Korean hot pepper paste.


How to make Bibimbap

At home, we often make this dish using the side dishes left over from previous meals. It&rsquos a delicious way to use up the leftovers. But, you can easily make this delicious rice bowl with freshly made simple side dishes.

This recipe seems long because I wanted to show you the typical toppings that go into an authentic bibimbap recipe. However, the recipe actually is a collection of several basic side dish (banchan) recipes that are very simple to make. I used 7 toppings, but any 3 or 4 of these will make a delightful rice bowl.

Other common toppings for bibimbap include mushrooms (sliced and sautéd), bellflower roots (doraji &ndash soaked and sautéd), sukju namul(bean sprouts), mu saengchae (radish salad), onion (sliced and sautéd), lettuce leaves, sliced kimchi, and so on. See my collection of 15 Korean vegetable side dishes for more options.

An egg can be sunny side up, or fully cooked. Sometimes, only a raw egg yoke is used, which is typical for Jeonju bibimbap, as shown in the photo below.


Signature Bowls

sushi rice (white/brown) / mixed greens / chilled sesame noodles

  • Hawaiian*
    tuna poké, mango, red onion, scallion, edamame peas, avocado, cucumber, wakame
  • Surf 'n' Turf*
    chicken ( katsu or teriyaki ), tuna, avocado, cucumber, wakame, spicy mayo

*Consuming raw or undercooked meats, poultry, seafood, shellfish, or eggs may increase your risk of foodborne illness.
**imitation crab


Watch the video: Steak Rice Bowl!! (December 2021).